Colonial fans

It’s summertime and it’s aircon time.

Except in our block.

A couple of the rented flats have it, but it doesn’t work. They (British) are most disappointed. After all it is sooooo hot here at not even thirty degrees. The Vamp living above has just had it put in.

‘The aircon doesn’t work,’ say the rentees to us. Well so what? And, none of our business. Not a block management issue.

Did you take the lease on with fully functioning aircon?

Try getting that out of the people you are renting from.

‘Can’t you put aircon in our block?’ said one of the younger residents whose parents own the flat.

‘Er, no. That’s up to you to put it in your flat.’

Some years ago, a few houses in our pueblo had it installed, when everyone had a few euros still.

Aircon = huge electricity bills.

Aircon, as I learned in Australia, means you have to take warm clothes with you to go to work, because it is freezing in the office and when you get outside your body has to adjust to roasting temperatures.

And while home aircon units aren’t associated with legionella I spent too long dealing with outbreaks to regard aircon kindly. Reminds me of recycled smoke in airplanes.

So, no, we don’t have aircon.

We have switched on fans occasionally. Primarily to keep mosquitoes at bay at night in preference to nasty chemical implants polluting the atmosphere and my lungs.

And, when we bought Gibflat, it had one of those gorgeous Somerset Maugham ceiling fans.

Sooo, colonial. Sooo exotic.

Sooo Apocalypse Now.

Aircon just doesn’t have the same ambience.

Credits to napalm, Coppola, Conrad, and The Doors.

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About roughseasinthemed

I write about my life as an English person living in Spain and Gibraltar, on Roughseas, subjects range from politics and current developments in Gib to book reviews, cooking and getting on with life. My views and thoughts on a variety of topics - depending on my mood of the day - can be found over on Clouds. A few pix are over on Everypic - although it is not a photoblog. And of course my dog had his own blog, but most of you knew that anyway. Pippadogblog etc
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92 Responses to Colonial fans

  1. disperser says:

    Gotta have A/C. Sure, humans adapt easier to hot weather than to cold, but I detest hot weather much more than cold. The ideal outside temperature for me is 65deg (F, or 18deg C, plus or minus a few degrees).

    I don’t sleep well if it’s warm (not even hot; just warm), and no amount of fans moving hot air about is going to make me suffer less (also, air blowing directly on me keeps me awake).

    This year is the first that we’ve had to contend with mosquitos (usually too dry) and insects in general . . . I don’t care for that either . . . or barking dogs, motorcycles . . . or people in general.

    We do have ceiling fans constantly running in the house, more because of the (stupidly) vaulted ceilings than for comfort. They move just enough to stir the air and avoid a buildup of heat fifteen feet above us.

    When the A/C is not running (after sunset we get a 15-20 deg drop in outside air temperature) we run a small house fan (a quiet one). This is because after the sun sets the wind also stops blowing, and a house fan is the best way to get that air into the house and, more important, into the attic.

    They say as one gets older they have a desire to move to warmer climates . . . I must be very young . . .

    Liked by 1 person

    • Go live in the UK. Ideal temps and climate for you 🙂

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    • disperser says:

      Let’s see . . . Brits live there (could be good or could be bad) . . . much less sunshine than here (bad) . . . any person bigger than me can beat me up (bad) . . . can’t hardly buy any land unless one is royalty or has a bowel that produces money(bad) . . . very crowded; can’t hardly spit without hitting someone; likely, a Brit (bad on both counts) . . . everyone speaks with a funny accent (eh, not a problem) . . . British food; one can’t survive on F&C (bad) . . . everyone drives on the wrong side of the road (bad) . . . let me do the tally . . .

      . . . I think I’ll stay put and turn on the A/C.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sunshine is er … unpredictable. We had two fantastic sunny warm holidays in the far north frozen wastes called Scotland. Three weeks in both cases of glorious weather. So it can be found with stealth and cunning.

        You can buy cheap properties in run-down areas. Depends how much land you want. Still, it’s a fairly safe investment. We always got ROI. The good thing about crowded places is that it’s easier to ignore people. Honest! Like living in cities or travelling on the tube. A mutually understood code.

        British food seems to be terrible these days. Every time I see a menu I have to look it up to interpret it. Everything is full of global bland Americanisms. Seriously. You would find yourself at home. There is slaw, not coleslaw, and some pork something or other that is basically a shredded pork sarnie. Can’t remember the name. Good F&C are extremely good. I doubt easily found these days though.

        Just remember how much energy you are consuming with the A/C 🙂

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      • disperser says:

        Once we got used to sunny days as the norm the mere thought of moving somewhere with less sunshine makes us depressed.

        Run-down areas would necessitate precautions I am not allowed in the UK. As for crowded places, the issue is not ignoring people. I can ignore really well. Thing is, people are noisy, rude, and these days inconsiderate. So, while I can easily manage the ignoring part that involves not having interaction with people, it’s impossible to accomplish the other part of ignoring, the part where no amount of ignoring is sufficient to keep others to intrude into my life. Just so you know, I used to live in Chicago. Not the suburbs, but Chicago proper. No plan to ever move to a city, or even places with more than 10-20K people about (unless well spread out).

        What do you mean “these days”? I could be wrong, but my impression was (and is) that bad food is like, a given.

        The only “American” food I eat be hamburgers; juicy, fat-laden burgers with various fixings. The rest is a mishmash based on our own preferences. I suppose it’s American because that’s where we buy it, eat it and live. If we eat out, the only tolerable choices are either a burger place (there are a few good ones) or Mexican.

        I know exactly how much energy I use . . . everything about my life is energy intensive.

        Comfortable house (around 70-73 deg. F year-round), large car (two, actually, but I can only drive one at a time), many amenities. That’s the way to go, and that’s the way I’m going. If people were really serious about conservation they would stop having kids. They aren’t, and therefore neither am I. That said, our plans are to get off the grid; solar and wind power. Not for any concern about anything other than ourselves.

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      • disperser says:

        Once we got used to sunny days as the norm the mere thought of moving somewhere with less sunshine makes us depressed.

        Run-down areas would necessitate precautions I am not allowed in the UK. As for crowded places, the issue is not ignoring people. I can ignore really well. Thing is, people are noisy, rude, and these days we can add inconsiderate. So, while I can easily manage the ignoring part that involves not having interaction with people, it’s impossible to accomplish the other part of ignoring, the part where no amount of ignoring is sufficient to keep others from intruding into my life and damaging my calm.

        Just so you know, I used to live in Chicago. Not the suburbs, but Chicago proper. No plan to ever move to a city, or even places with more than 10-20K people about (unless well spread out).

        What do you mean “these days”? I could be wrong, but my impression was (and is) that UK bad food is like, a given.

        The only “American” food I eat be hamburgers; juicy, fat-laden burgers with various fixings. The rest is a mishmash based on our own preferences. I suppose it’s American because that’s where we buy it, eat it and live. If we eat out, the only tolerable choices are either a burger place (there are a few good ones) or Mexican.

        I know exactly how much energy I use . . . everything about my life is energy intensive.

        Comfortable house (around 70-73 deg. F year-round), large car (two, actually, but I can only drive one at a time), many amenities. That’s the way to go, and that’s the way I’m going. If people were really serious about conservation they would stop having kids. They aren’t, and therefore neither am I. That said, our plans are to get off the grid; solar and wind power. Not for any concern about anything other than ourselves.

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        • Well if people were serious they would think about having children rather than doing what everyone else does. But you know, brain cells are distributed randomly at birth. I’m hardly going to argue with you about the kid thing. Couples like us are doing the world a favour. And what credit do we get? Imagine even more roughseas and dispersers in the world?

          Three four bys here 🙂 but only drive one at once too. Current ten-year-old vehicle has just over 30.000 klicks on it. We thought about going off grid. Hellish expensive to install.

          UK food is like any. Good and bad home cooking. Good and bad meals out. It’s like my image of American food. Too much, greasy, full of dead animals and horrible commercial sauces. Fish and chips are better than that. Stereotype but actually, fish, chips and mushy peas is a better meal.

          So 30,000 people in a couple of square miles (Gib) wouldn’t suit eh?

          Ignoring people is about living within yourself. And, truth is, don’t know about parts of the UK but we were talking today about how we have no fear about walking out in Gib or our Spanish pueblo at any time. For me, that’s a good place to live.

          Liked by 1 person

        • disperser says:

          I can only imagine half of that . . .

          . . . and we feel perfectly safe going for walks around here . . . except for the bears, but the odds of a bear attack are not that high; not zero, either.

          The off-grid thing is expensive, but we’re looking long term. That means we have to find a place where we’re likely to stay put otherwise it’s not worth the expense.

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          • Half is better than nothing. Wild animals in my part of the world are macaques. They do bite. They also respond to sensible behaviour and conversation. Unlike vicious seagulls who clearly have read Daphne du Maurier.

            We never thought we were settled. Not sure we are now. So, the investment never happened.

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  2. violetwisp says:

    I totally agree with you. Expensive and unpleasant for anything less than 35 degrees. That whole needing warm clothes to go into houses and businesses in hot countries is bonkers. I did have a change of heart when I had a screaming newborn baby at anything more than 30 degrees, I don’t think I could have coped without the aircon then.

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    • Well plenty of other women have managed it. Not me, I most hastily add.

      It was Australia that did it for me. Walk out, nice ambient temperature, bloody frio in an office. Come back out and roasting. Even going to the shops in a mall, freezing. I’d just rather have the same temp everywhere and acclimatise. Sans bebe of course.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. davidprosser says:

    Would memsahib like a chota peg or a gin and lime under the fan?
    xxx Massive Hugs xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  4. john zande says:

    Summer here is blasting fans, point-blank.

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      • john zande says:

        Positively, and to combat the mozzies. You know we have dengue here?

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        • Dengue seems to be increasing. Touch wood not in my part of the Med. I suspect we are luckier being coastal in both Gib and Spain, that we don’t get too many mozzies. We are meant to be in a leishmaniasis area too but how you are meant to avoid letting your dogs out at dusk/dark is beyond me. Again, I think being coastal lessens the risk. Pure speculation though. More chance of tick disease. Sorry, I digressed onto animals.

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  5. pinkagendist says:

    In Soto we had aircon in all the south facing rooms. Was it 2012 or 2013 that we had 40 degree temperatures? When it gets that bad, it makes a difference. Today we had 37 here, and this is supposed to be the frigid north. Before we left Spain I bought us thermal underwear onesies, lined gloves and boots- I was prepared for Arctic cold. I may have overestimated how far north we were going.

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    • I don’t remember 12/13 as being outstandingly hot. I do remember 2004 or 5 because A was in the UK and we had a few days of blistering heat from Africa. It was this amazingly hot breeze and the temps were scorching but because it was so dry it was lovely. It was an ola de calor but because there’s one every year it tends to mean very little.

      Once it goes over 25 it’s all the same to me. 30, 35, 40, I really can’t tell the difference. Just need to languish inside with a cold drink.

      I don’t think we’ve managed 37 anywhere round here yet. You should never have left Spain. Serves you right.

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  6. This area is major AC territory – although we grew up without it. The unit noise, being closed up, and feeling like you need a sweater if you go anyplace does get old quickly. We have ceiling fans and the dogs hang out under those most of the day when I switch the temp way up. This house is really insulated and the trees shade us now, so the bills aren’t such a terror. We do like to sleep cool….but if someone asks for a blanket, then, someone’s been messing with the temp.
    Heard Britain is having a hotter than usual time – we hit 95F today for the first time ( but we have a sea breeze dawn and dusk…now if some clouds would just show up) . Summer’s late, but here.

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    • We used to switch the ceiling fan on for Pippa when he went to lie underneath it. Both dogs spend/spent more time on the cool tiles than on furniture in summer. Snowy was jumping on and off the bed in Spain the last few days to flop on the floor. We did retrieve a sheet to cover us when an annoying mozzie snuck into the bedroom with a bzzzzzzzz.

      Not up on the news. It’s rare Britain doesn’t have a few decent days at least. When I was a kid I’m sure summers were always sunny. Either that or I was extremely tough in my swimsuit on the beach for eight weeks.

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      • Been swiping at one of those tiny black gnats all afternoon. Driving me nuts, but one at night is pure torture.
        Since the gulf waters here are so sandy and muddy, we never wore “good” bathing suits to the beach. You had to have a swim suit wardrobe: beach, pool, sometimes swim team/camp specified suit, water skiing….Things cost much less then….and there were those great end of season sales. And you wanted to grab one for school – at that time every Jr high/middle school kid took swimming in PE for one 6 weeks. The area was serious about water safety for kids. But pools got expensive to keep up and girls hated to get their hair wet, so swimming became an elected PE class/team sports but that’s about it.
        It’s close to 100 now, Molly’s wishing for a nice swimmable pool. Hope you got that bug smashed. I’m not having much luck

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  7. EllaDee says:

    Aircon is a touchy topic in our city household. I work in an aircon building and it’s a joy to get out into the fresh air each evening. We would, and did live quite happily without it. Old previous apartment was hot but had cross ventilation so you could get a breeze, and a couple of fans were sufficient most of the time. It had no aircon anyway so we sucked it up for 7 years except the one time it was over 40 for days and we had no sleep so decamped to a motel on the coast for a night! This apartment, mass produced, has no insect screens, no cross ventilation, is next to a noisy train line… but still for 3 years we left the 2 sliding doors open and aircon off. Until that bastard walked in one hot night and stole my handbag. In winter it’s cool enough to sleep with the aircon off but in summer a shut up apartment is stifling, even with sliding doors locked open a few inches or a fan on. I was terrified the first time the power bill came after we started leaving the aircon on overnight but it was only $30 more. But we still hate it! Far better at TA where we have ceiling fans, open windows & doors, verandahs and sufficient confidence in our safety. In the kitchen we don’t even have a range hood/extractor fan, the ceiling fan does that job too. There’s an old aircon unit in the living room window that’s been turned on twice in 10 years in 40+ heat before we had the ceiling insulated and the fans installed.
    It would be… will be… lovely to go back to the old days and old ways 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • We acquired some mosquito screens from a client in Gib and fitted them to a couple of windows so we could leave them on the sneck all the time. Made a big difference. We fitted them in the finca years ago, but basically we keep the shitters closed there during the day to keep the sun out. Soft stone absorbs enough heat as it is. Gibflat is north facing and concrete so cooler anyway.

      But, Spain was built in the old style, small windows, minimum glass (or maybe none originally) so a refuge from the sun in summer. Although we have rejas (window grilles) everywhere, we don’t leave windows or doors open at night. I did open the bedroom one a couple of nights this week. To break in would mean jumping over the eight foot patio wall, slashing the mosquito screen and sawing off the bars. All without waking up Snowy. Unlikely.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Crime here put a stop to sleeping with open windows. (The dogs they just pepper spray or hit with a baseball bat.) The window bars here are pretty jail like and many areas won’t give architectural approval for their installation. (But the door companies have stolen some beautiful iron work design elements from Spain for door security. So many door kick-in robberies. We’re thinking about that.
      Architecture in the cities have changes since I was a kid – homes were built to take advantage of the prevailing winds, large overhangs for shade, porches and screened porches, and whole house fans. Offices had opening windows. Now even many houses are built without opening windows. The office buildings are mazes and windowless cages – and AC must be kept cool in the big buildings to keep mold at bay…ending up with musty smelling, cold caves that become sick buildings with bad air if they aren’t careful. People get sick or feel bad and don’t realize why.
      I quit one job because a building like that – would rather do with less money and see the sky once and a while.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. makagutu says:

    Nairobi is generally ambient- indoor temperatures being anything from 18- 27 deg C. Poor construction methods have created a need for aircons in most places in this country though.

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  9. Sonel says:

    I’m no fan of aircons. Those things are poison to someone who has allergies and of course you have to keep the doors and windows closed when you switch them on. Something I don’t do here in summer. All the doors and windows are open and the ceiling fans keep us cool. 😀

    Some of the rooms here didn’t have ceiling fans in when we moved in and we accepted it like that. When I told the landlord I’ll paint the ceilings and walls in the house, we made a deal that he put in ceiling fans in those rooms as well. A win-win for sure. 😀

    Like you I do prefer the same temp everywhere. I hate in when I walk into a shop and it’s freezing cold because of their aircons.

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    • Allergies huh? I was discussing this yesterday when we were driving back. (No aircon in vehicle). Out of nowhere I get an itch in my nose. Sneeze. Sneeze. Sneeze. It’s bad enough in natural air, if it was recirculated? Aaaaagh (tissue).

      Interesting how many people do deals about decorating. A mate of A’s did that and was gutted when the owner went on to sell it for a rather nice profit after the mate’s redec 😀

      Two rules in life:
      Avoid aircon
      Avoid shops

      Optional third:
      Avoid people

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sonel says:

        We don’t have on either in our Uno. I do prefer the wind in my short hair. 😆 Luckily the air here is still clean, until you drive down to Rustenburg or Brits. There the air is so polluted by the mining companies, I start sneezing when we drive in and have sinusitis for a week after that.

        That’s a shame and yes, that’s some folks for you. I do prefer the third one and for me it’s not optional. I avoid people where I can. 😆 Great rules! 😀 ♥

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        • Ah yes. Wind in hair. In my case longer so all in my face 😀

          Brits? I thought you meant Brits pollute the air!!

          I nearly took pix of the oil refineries on the approach to Gib, set up by Franco, so that when the wind blows our way we get all their crap.

          Thought you’d like my rules 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          • Sonel says:

            hahahaha! That can work as well. 😀

            Whahahah! No, a town near us called Brits. Well, if you do get a lot of Brits together in a small place, they could do that too. 😛

            Yuck! A pity you can’t bottle that crap and let them have it.

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          • Gets annoying after a while.

            Plenty of British ghettoes in Spain. Try and avoid them. Not much point coming to Spain and living in little England. But there again, I avoid most people, so I’m not being racist 🙂
            Just personist.

            Bottle it? I’d need a f***ing tanker!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Sonel says:

            Same here and no, we’re not being racists. It’s just how it is. 😀

            Whahahaha! A tanker it is then. Flood their houses and let them live with it. 😀

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          • Remind me not to fall out with you 😀

            Liked by 1 person

          • Sonel says:

            hahaha. They can be glad I’m not a politician.

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          • Not a chance. You’re too honest.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Sonel says:

            hahaha! Well, I would have been an honest politician and give them hell.

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          • Darling. You would never get voted in. People don’t want honesty.

            ‘Money’s tight, times are hard. There ain’t no (fucking) Christmas card.’

            Slightly adapted from the original, which I think was ‘here’s your fucking Christmas card’ but that was pre-Internet and pre current austerity times.

            But people don’t like bad news. Especially not when on the other hand the rich get richer …

            Liked by 1 person

          • Sonel says:

            Yeah, that’s true. I won’t even be able to pretend I’m dishonest. Shit! LOL!

            That’s also true hon and thank the gords for that. I don’t believe in Xmas. 😀

            hahahah! Sounds like the songs that Kevin Bloody Wilson sings.

            Nobody likes bad news and that is bad news. I wonder why it’s like that. Do you think they’re dishonest? 😛

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          • Ah Santa Claus, where’s me pram and me bike? A FB ‘friend’ posted it a few years back and it had us in stitches. Love it.

            A takes people on face value. I don’t. But if they screw him over its not a pretty sight. Easier to avoid I say. Honesty? What’s that?

            Liked by 1 person

          • Sonel says:

            hahahah! He is hilarious for sure. 😀

            I don’t either. I won’t trust someone until I’m sure they can be trusted and sometimes even they screw you over.

            Sounds like hubby. Even I disappear when hubby gets angry and that doesn’t happen quite often.

            Good question. When you’re honest, folks avoid you like the plague. I do prefer honest people in my life. At least then you know where you stand.

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          • Which brings us back round to a good reason to avoid people 🙂 Give me a dog any day.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Sonel says:

            Absolutely! 😀 ♥

            Liked by 1 person

          • Keep them at the end of a computer. Best place for them 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  10. Ruth says:

    We didn’t have a/c in our house until I was a teenager. They did in the shops, of course. We didn’t have it on the school bus or in our classroom, either, until I went to high school. Most cars didn’t have it either. These days we think we can’t get along without it. It is really hot here. The last two weeks have been filled with days of 95F(35C) temps with the heat index making it feel 105F(40C). It will remain that way until mid September. The humidity is a killer. I completely agree with you about the a/c in offices and shops, though. I’m fairly sensitive to cold, not so much heat. One of the owners here is hot natured so when he walks through the door he pushes the a/c thermostat down to 60F(15C). His office is also in the front of the building and has huge windows that face the sun so his office gets hotter than the rest. I’m stuck in back. No windows. Just icicles hanging from the ceiling.

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    • First met aircon when I went to Aus. Not that Sydney was that hot, but they do have long consistent summers. Met it in buses in Spain and even the local Gib buses. Damn nuisance, like offices you need to take something to cover arms and shoulders.

      Early 30s in Spain for us, but only high twenties in Gib. Inland Spain always hits 40/45 and people usually die. There’s a heat wave every year. It’s called summer.

      Sounds like an office from hell. Without the heat.

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      • Ruth says:

        Yeah, I work hard at combating the freezing temps in my office. He cranks the a/c down and I turn on the little heater under my desk. Ridiculous. It’s 40C outside and I have on a heater. Smh…

        The last few days here have been really hot. Yesterday was 43C and today is meant to be 46C. There are quite a few low income homes that don’t have aircon. People usually die(mostly elderly) when it gets this hot here. They haven’t called it a heatwave. I’m not sure how many days it has to hit those temps for it to be considered one. This is early July, though. It doesn’t normally get this hot until August.

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        • I’ve been known to have my windows open in winter and a heater on. It’s cold anyway so I’d still need the heater but I want the fresh air. But a heater with aircon? That sums up society. I hate that other people can control MY environment.

          Maybe heatwave = people dying? Once a few have died we’ll call it a heatwave? My late 80s neighbours don’t have it either. Fewer people have aircon in my pueblo than those who don’t. Same in Gib, but Gib isn’t as hot.

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          • Ruth says:

            I pretty much have my ceiling fan going all the time. I’d rather turn the a/c up a bit and have air circulating. All of our windows are painted shut, with multiple layers of paint. I’ll never understand why people do that. They’re old single-pane windows that are not energy efficient. We’re hoping in the next couple of years to replace them with energy efficient ones that actually open. We’d use our aircon at home a lot less than we do now. I don’t care for the heat or the aircon blowing directly on me. I’m far less likely to use the heat than I am the aircon, though, I must admit.

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          • Aircon isn’t air circulating though. Unless it’s changed 😀 Last I encountered it, it’s specific draughts of downward air. Cold air. Not circulating ambient air.

            People paint windows shut because they don’t know what they are doing. Simple. Unless, of course, they want to paint them shut for a reason ie to not to open windows. Of course, you can unseal them. (Just asked the expert). Take a Stanley knife (ask the Brit) down the joints, very gently, and break the seal. That should work. Ease the windows very gently. If nec, you may need to do it on the outside. Then you can sand the crappy paintwork and start again. Need to be careful you don’t cut yourself. These are wooden windows, right? But it would work with Al or plastic too. L

            Use strong gloves too. ie builders’ gloves.

            Easier and cheaper than buying new windows …

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          • Ruth says:

            No, aircon isn’t circulating air. It’s just as you said, draughts of downward air. Or, in the case of my house, upward air. Just like heating. I’m not a big fan of either. I’d rather have the windows open, unless it’s brutally hot or cold, like the last few days, and run ceiling fans.

            I need to look into replacement screens for the windows. The previous owners apparently discarded them when they painted(or had them painted) them shut – on the inside and out.

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          • Ruth, just email me if you want to know more about it! Windows and screens, OK?

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          • Ruth says:

            I actually just walked outside and had a look at the windows just outside my office. They look like they’ll need painting fairly soon anyway.

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          • That probably means they should have been painted years ago!

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          • Ruth says:

            I think they were painted about a year before we moved in. This is our third summer here.

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          • Should be pretty easy to loosen up then. Says she who has always had someone else to do that 😀

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          • Wait! It’s Sunday?! Isn’t it?

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          • Ruth says:

            It is! I’m sitting in my home-office. That’s where I do all my bookkeeping for clients that I serve outside of my full-time job.

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          • Ha! I should be working too.

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          • PS send me some photos?

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          • Ruth says:

            Will do!

            Liked by 1 person

  11. Ruth says:

    I have no idea why my comment went where it did.

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  12. On Monday the daily high in St. John’s was 8.5 C. To put that in perspective Canada’s most northern community, Resolute Bay, located around 900 km from the North Pole, had a daily high of 10 C. Needless to say there was no need of air conditioning.

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  13. I’m from Texas. Pools are like bathwater by 10 AM. I shudder to think of life without A/C. I was just reading an article the other day about how we used to build homes to account for the heat. We used better window placement, shading trees, shutters, etc. Now, we rely on these machines that are horrible for the environment.

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    • Philosopher Mouse is from Texas. You know Ruth is in Georgia (I think? Too many states to work out in my head). Sonel is in SA, John in Brazil, Mak in Kenya (you know all those too).

      Pools! You have a pool? !!!!!!

      Windows? Tick. Not many. Small. Only one south facing.

      Trees? No ground 😦 shelter though over the terrace when we get round to putting it up in summer. Trees are for another story.

      Shutters? Yup. Shutters on every single window in Spain. In Gib we have dark curtains, personfully made by me, pulled across when the sun comes round to lose the heat, used in winter to keep us warm.

      It’s really not difficult. At what point did people stop thinking?

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  14. Sorry to pop on out of topic. I can’t find your short story. Can you post the link here, or show me. I’m sure it’s in front of my face and I’ve just missed it. I do that. *smiles*.

    – s.u.t.Cloud

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    • Not mine. Sorry to be so cloudy. No, I have a short story on another blog that I am planning to read. Still haven’t read it yet. So I certainly don’t have time to write my own. I wish.

      I’m still not clear am I. I do not have a short story on a blog. There, that is better. When I say I have, I mean I am in possession of something. Hmmm. I had a late night …

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m with you. In as much as I get you. In as much as busy bees don’t get to taste their own honey as often as they might do. Good grief. The Cloud had invaded my mind too today. *smiles with eyes crossed*. Can’t say I’m not disappointed though.

        – s.u.t.C

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        • Well, there is a Nanowrimo blog out there of a not so short story (depending on whose definitions we use, H may consider it a True Romance short or flash fiction) which involves a glamorous heroine with long legs, who drives land rovers and drinks wine (not together), also her legs are not always together and she likes dogs. The dogs and the legs don’t actually come together. I shouldn’t have written that story as she ended up in hospital with a an ankle accident. I wrote it before I broke my ankle on a dog walk. I shall in future desist from writing tragic comedies based on me.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Hahahaha. Open legs and flashing will get H’s attention for sure. They do say write what you know. I’m lucky, having access to so many other lives, dimension, and receiving never-ending transmissions from all and sundry. It isn’t easy being a Cloud, but a nice glass of JD with ice whilst doing the can-can eases the stresses of the day I find. *grins*.

            – s.u.t.Cloud

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  15. Pingback: A Proper Temper Tantrum | Out From Under the Umbrella

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